Members

Members Of The AIPC

Estacio Valoi
Investigative Journalist
Estacio Valoi focuses on environmental crime and looting in his country, Mozambique, which is racked by poaching of rhino and elephant and robbed of its gemstone and timber resources by a myriad of criminal syndicates, often connected to the highest levels in government. His latest challenge saw him duck and dive bulldozers and security companies’ machine guns in Montepuez, an area ravaged by destructive mining practices and forced removals of villagers, perpetrated by a local elite in cahoots with a multinational gemstones company.
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Idris Akinbajo
Investigative Journalist
Idris Akinbajo was part of the intrepid team that exposed the involvement of Nigerians in the US$ 180 million Halliburton bribery scandal; uncovered a scam in which important oil resources were sold out by a Nigerian minister to a shady company; infiltrated a private sector mafia raking in government oil subsidies; and is now mentoring a new generation of reporters associated with Nigeria’s prime investigative online news site, the Premium Times.
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Muno Gedi
At only twenty-five years of age, Muno Gedi has already investigated the prevalence of female genital mutilation among young women in her country, the sale of food aid in refugee camps as well as violent conflict between different regional clans and the stances of the Somali people with regard to the militant Al Shabaab movement. In the absence of any established investigative media houses in Somalia, she works mainly on a free-lance basis with ZAM www.zammagazine.com.
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Lazaro Mabunda
Investigative Journalist
His travels into the Mozambican-South African border areas have earned Lazaro Mabunda some notoriety, but also many good contacts in the many villages in the region that are ruled by rhino poaching gangs. Defying threats and real attempts on his life, Mabunda exposed how local authorities finance their cars and mansions –even municipal offices- with money from rhino poaching, and how they use poor Mozambican youth as cannon fodder when it comes to confronting the machinegun-armed rangers in the Kruger Park. Counting extrajudicial executions by rangers in this nature reserve, Mabunda recently exposed the fact that in the past eight years 352 Mozambicans were killed these on suspicion of being poachers. Mabunda has recently turned his investigative attention to the increasingly regular killings of activists, honest officials and academics, which often follow a stance taken against corruption in his country.
Selay Kouassi
Investigative Journalist
Selay Kouassi initiated the award-nominated transnational investigation into ‘Fair-Trade’ chocolate, ‘The Fair-Trade Chocolate Rip-Off.’ In the course of the investigation, for which he and three other West African colleagues interviewed workers at a total of seventy cocoa farms in the region, he was threatened by individuals connected with ‘Fair-Trade’ cooperatives and others in the West African cocoa mafia. In his long career he has also investigated water supply performance by West African governments and the reasons behind the civil war in his country, Ivory Coast. He is presently conducting research into NGOs in his country, asking why some of these don’t do more to support social struggles by people who try to hold leaders accountable.
Anas Aremeyaw Anas
Investigative Journalist
Anas Aremeyaw Anas http://anasaremeyawanas.org/ is Ghana’s and arguably Africa’s most famous investigative journalist. He uses undercover camera to show realities –from witchcraft to crime to illegal abortion- that are experienced daily by millions of Africans, yet often ignored by the rest of the world –including charities and NGO’s. Anas’ partnerships with Western journalists have led to films shown by, among others, BBC and CNN. A documentary, Chameleon http://www.eyesteelfilm.com/chameleon, has been made about him. He plays a leading role in the AIPC.
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Tobore Ovuorie
Investigative Journalist
Tobore Ovuorie's investigations into the trade in fake mosquito nets and fake yellow fever vaccination cards already won awards before she even embarked on her biggest feat to date: going undercover inside Nigeria's human trafficking mafia. The story, exposing how criminal syndicates benefit from tough migration restrictions and from the criminalisation of sex work, made headlines all over the world and earned Ovuorie speaking slots at several investigative journalism conferences. It also came at great cost to Ovuorie, who was physically and mentally abused during her undercover time with criminals. Recovering, she now spends more time doing internet-based research and speaking about her experiences, which have informed police investigations in Nigeria and questions in the European parliament. "Though I would do it differently if I were to do the story again, and I realise that no story is worth your life, I still think that it was and is necessary to report on the risks faced by women in sex work. They still face daily abuse as a result of the criminalisation of their trade."
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Selase Kove-Seyram
Investigative Journalist
In a recent documentary Selase Kove-Seyram asked why, while as many as one third of the Ghanaian population suffer from Sickle Cell disease, their government does lamentably little to treat, assist or even diagnose the people in need of such help. The answer: ‘donors don’t prioritise the condition.’ Kove-Seyram has also highlighted the plight of street children in his country, many of whom turn to sex work or live on garbage dumps, whilst the government’s department of social welfare seems to be twiddling its thumbs. His latest feat was to join an activists’ project and a New York Times crew, chasing ruthless fish poachers from his (and other countries’) coastal waters.
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Theophilus Abbah
Investigative Journalist
Theophilus Abbah, editor of the Daily Trust on Sunday in Nigeria, discovered astonishing amounts of wasted money when checking on government projects to build clinics and power plants; navigated the creeks of the Niger Delta to find out the truth behind the vandalisation of multinational oil company pipelines; reported on the villages where Boko Haram recruits its soldiers; and exposed his country’s oil oligarchs who amass riches whilst citizens stay poor. His latest endeavour is the in-depth exposure of corrupt syndicates in African state bureaucracies.
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Chief Bisong Etahoben
Investigative Journalist
Chief Bisong Etahoben is a Cameroonian investigative journalist and editor-in-chief of the Weekly Post newspaper. He led the ‘Killing Soccer,’ team which dealt with the shenanigans of FIFA in Africa and participated in ‘The Fair-Trade Chocolate Rip-Off’, which was nominated for the highest journalism award in the Netherlands. ‘Chief’ is a member of a number of international investigative journalism professional bodies as well as a traditional leader.
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Tshireletso Motlogelwa
Investigative Journalist and Editor
Formerly ace investigative reporter at Mmegi, now editor of the Business Weekly and Review in Gaborone, Botswana, Tshireletso Motlogelwa often feels compelled to shake up Botswana’s stereotypical image of a friendly country full of ‘noble primitive’ ‘Bushmen’ and with one rather amazing lady detective as first citizen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_No._1_Ladies%27_Detective_Agency. That, however, is not the Botswana Motlogelwa lives in as he investigates diamond murders, secret service harassment of critical citizens, a massive military and armaments stockpile, a web of arms deal millionnaires and a totally opaque presidential dynasty.
Eric Mwamba
Investigative Journalist
Eric Mwamba’s reports on the Ivorian cocoa mafia, the international trade in young African football players and, most recently, his deep-digging exposure of the system of corruption that reigns in the DRC have been exemplary pieces of investigative journalism. Pioneering an approach whereby he runs ‘long-distance’ investigations with colleagues in different francophone countries, Mwamba networks with many fellow journalists in investigations into resource exploitation in the Congolese and Great Lakes region.
Benon Herbert Oluka
Investigative Journalist
Benon Herbert Oluka has investigated the fate of several former child soldiers in Uganda and discovered that, whilst some overcame their trauma through help from their communities and local institutions, millions in donor assistance were largely wasted on temporary projects. He has also investigated many cases of corruption (in electricity provision and contaminated meat, just to name two) in Uganda and has recently founded The Watchdog, an anti-corruption investigative journalism centre that he hopes will add to his own individual efforts. His latest project is to find some honest government officials, try find out what makes them tick, and which obstacles they face in trying to do their jobs.
Zack Ohemeng Tawiah
Investigative Journalist
Zack Tawiah first gained fame when he went undercover as a ‘doctor’ in Ghana’s Komfo Anyoke Teaching hospital and exposed that vital equipment in the hospital was broken or at risk of breaking down, with patients dying daily on its operating tables because of the faulty equipment. From there he went on to take up the plight of the Asuboi community, a rural set of villages where seventy percent of people suffer from the parasite- based river blindness disease, or onchocerciasis. Tawiah succeeded in appealing to Ghana’s health services to assist the villagers, but not before he slipped with his motorbike on the muddy narrow single-track road –in itself a reason why the villages were left to suffer alone for so long- and broke his leg. Recovered, he went on to expose large scale mismanagement at Ghana’s public transport company Metro Mass Transport. The report caused massive worker protests, the dismissal of the managing director (and his deputy) and the dissolution of the governing board. Tawiah is now investigating why still so many of his fellow citizens die of malaria, in spite of millions in donor funds given to his country to fight the disease.
Kassim Mohamed
Investigative Journalist
Kassim Mohamed’s reports on arms smuggling in the East African region have won him several awards, as have his undercover exploits among criminal syndicates in Nairobi. When he spent some time in the Netherlands invited by ZAM, he found and interviewed refugees from his country living in dilapidated buildings, railway stations and on the streets and made a report for ZAM titled ‘Please take me home to Mogadishu.’ Now working as a documentary producer, he and his team have exposed Kenyan police death squads who don’t exactly help to convince people that the government is the ‘good guy’ in the fight with rebels and militants.
Lawrence Seretse
Investigative Editor
Lawrence Seretse is an investigative editor at The Botswana Gazette and an associate at Oxpeckers Environmental Investigations. He has made headlines with stories about the lucrative captive breeding of lions and their sale to ‘canned hunting’ facilities; the shady shell companies around Botswana’s largest tourism company; the millions embezzled through Botswana’s spy agency; the De Beers tax avoidance scandals and more. His investigations have been featured by the Forum for African Investigative Reporters, Mail &Guardian, ANCIR, The Business Weekly, Mmegi, and the Wealth of Nations.
Ken Opala
Founding Editor
Ken Opala is the founding editor of the African Investigative News Service (AINews), a news syndication based in Nairobi Kenya. He has worked in various capacities – environmental reporter, investigative editor, editor-in-chief – in some of Kenya’s leading newsrooms, including the Nation Media Group, the largest news publisher in East and Central Africa. Ken is a past winner of the CNN African Journalist of the Year 1997, Kenya Print Journalist of the Year, Peter Jenkins Journalism Award for Conservation Reporting, and the Lorenzo Natali Journalism Award managed by the European Commission. He has also been shortlisted for many other local and international journalism awards.